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in the country. t we did too big surveys of these folks. what i found fascinating as if began to look through theegan results of the service, the t difference in how people were how pe responding to questions aboutop opportunity and access as anitya function of age or asra generations. would go into this a little bit later, but a short story is s those people who were under 40 and you have a system that i have organized where i call these people generations, the people under 40 responded quitei differently to those who were over 40 in terms of how muchm discrimination date received in the workplace and how much ofp today's date of were available for them personally. just in terms of how difficult it was to make it in americanci, society. and so once i saw this interesting generational break out in the data we went back w ahead of a small group ofarchers researchers and conducted overdu 130 follow-up interviews just in the people in the survey in addition to over 100 interviewst conducted generally from the book.t so it was somewhat different methodology. but change, the country changed in som
professor with the big ears and a funny name. now all bets are off. obama just might be willing to be the next president of the united states. it would be the capstone of an amazing rise for a politician whose charisma and personal story. the harvard educated has breezed life into the democratic party. at the heart of obama is his personality and presence. part preacher and professor and part movie star. his charisma seems effortless, his charm and afterthought. who is that guy? he certainly got it. he describes obama as the third african-american since reconstruction to serve in the senate. he delivered the keynote address at the 2004 national convention and won a grammy for the audio version of his memoir and he said he need look no farther than his desk in the senate chamber to be reminded of the last politician who embody the hopes of a generation, designed by its previous occupant including bobby kennedy. with that here we are today. conservatives, as we all know as late as last week, conservatives are questioning whether he was born, the degree to which progressives who ar
.i. joe," the lakers and the celtics in the championship. apple wuss big, then it -- was big, then it went away for a while, then it was back again. so it should be obvious that the 1980s is back, and for various reasons i argue in the book, it is back. and i don't think it's just because of the nostalgia factor although that's certainly a factor. also there's some coincidences. i had mentioned on my radio show a couple days ago that the weird coincidence, although you may see it not just as a coincidence, that 25 years ago almost to the exact week and, certainly, to the exact month the united states military was bombing libya, and the world was wrapped with the detention about a nuclear meltdown at chernobyl. those two things happened almost exactly 25 years ago to the month. so as much of this is pop culture, some of it is very, very real. and what i argue in the book is that the popular culture of the 1980s, the iconography of the 1980s in many ways has inspired the way we hook at real world -- look at real world events and how real world, i guess you would call them actors, behave toda
it was no big deal. as she walked into the clinic something odd happened to another girl cautioned her and said all babies want to be born. james ignored or. what did this young woman no? your baby has a hard. jane in order again. your baby has fingernails. now, that was odd. this should occur. she walked into the abortion clinic and she sat down. she glanced around and she couldn't help but notice that everyone is playing with their fingernails. tapping them on the tables, chewing on them and she thought i have a life growing inside of me and she walked out of the abortion clinic and that was the end of the story. how many of you remember the statistic i gave you about a minute and a half ago? how many of you remember what prompted jane to walk out of the abortion clinic? everybody remembers the fingernails. and i promise you we cannot even those who your remembered the statistic, 1,466,000, those who remember the forgotten assist a six and would have remembered the finger nails. narratives matter. we have fought into the trap of thinking that intellectual argument tends to trump emotion. you
are no longer serious about solving big problems. and that was sort of the subject of my first book in 2007 looking ahead to the 2008 presidential race. and the big issues in education, and health care, and energy, the environment and jobs, and so on, and i think that you can really see that playing out in washington right now as we have this debate about the budget. and that this budget debate in some ways has become about paul ryan and his plan and his thinking of the budget. but that the idea that we as a nation can all agree that there is one guy in washington talking seriously about the budget is an indictment of everyone else in congress who is not, that we're sort of at this point where you want to talk about the budget? there's one guy is taking this really seriously. he's the one who's thinking about how to solve the budget problem. these are huge issues. generational issues that are going to have to be solved one way or another. and the fact that there's not a larger debate that involves more people on both sides of the aisle i think is a stunning indictment of where we are in a p
. and although i had seen her once before, the big time i saw her when i had the horseback riding accident and i broke my back and i was unconscious for a while and i was laid up for a little bit but as a kid fortunately, i healed and i'm moving around great. part of overcoming that is not believing the doctors when they said you should be glad you can walk. you're lucky you're not dead. well, yeah, sure but i wanted to do more and we kept going finally i had to go to a chiropractor to find somebody that said, okay, maybe exercise is okay. maybe you can try jogging, yeah, maybe you can do stuff to strengthen your back. boy, i latched onto that and i was into cheerleading and dancing and i felt great and i got my body back, just as you start to feel good life has a opportunity to slap you back down. i had some fun times, you know, cheerleading, did the tractor queen thing. i'm sure there's not a lot of people out there that would admit they were tractor queen if they ever were. i would have rather driven the tractor -- tractor queen, i'm the queen of the tractor nowadays they would probably let y
rage came out which the big magazine excerpt came out of 93 and the book came out in 94. not long after rage came out you saw changes in corporate america. you saw a small but interesting group begin to rise. you saw richard carson became the head of time warner and the head of american express. you saw change in the calculus. of course with the recent presidential election you saw something that many people of many colors felt never happened at least in our lifetime which was the election of a president identified as african-american. the other thing that happened which is something that i found interesting is in the years since that book came out a new generation has come along so a lot of the voices represented in rage are different from the voice is represented in "the end of anger". it is not just a couple words about that. even though i've settled 100 interviews for rage i did more for this book. in addition to interviews a conducted a couple surveys. i did a survey of the black alumni of harvard business school. 74 questions. and also survey of graduates called the better chance
dreams in which i had these. guide he came and helped me. and although i've seen her once before, the big time i saw her was when i had the first tech writing accident in the my back and was unconscious for a while. as a kid, for chile part of overcoming out with not believing the doctors and a side you should be glad you can walk. you are lucky you weren't dead. oh yeah, sure, but i wanted to do more. we kept going. finally had to go to the chiropractor to find somebody that said maybe exercise is okay. maybe you can try jogging. yeah, maybe you could use that to strength in your back. i latched onto god and that is when i got into dance team chemistry living in the which an escape --a physical escape. i felt great. i got my body back. and then just as you start to feel good, life has a tendency sometimes to thought you back down. it is happening to me. i had some fun times, cheerleading, i'm sure there's not a lot of people out there i would even admit that they were trying to clean if they [laughter] while to us. and you know what, i would have rather two minute track here. i thought a
is not the first place that would come to mind to have a big ice skating right. among other reasons, because it nothing ever freezes there. but this is what we did last year, and we made it into the guinness book of world records. so you ask yourself, ask this question a couple of years ago, why in the world do we do this? and he came up with a sort of intelligent answer. because this is the kind of competition we like. we are the only ones competing. [laughter] you can't lose if you're in the competition for the world's biggest because nobody else is doing it. nobody else is crazy enough to do this stuff, just in time or money on a. not going to happen. and so, we love that kind of competition. the problem of course is that that version to competition extends antitrust policy, what extent of the type of monopolies we have, would've extended the type of concentration of power we have. then it gets complicated. then things don't work anymore. and so i going to the same story about slim which i think is most respectful but also somewhat critical, not of his personality or persona, but the situ
on that's really designed to do one big grand strategic thing that wherever you look in the middle east and that is to shore up the strength, the responsiveness of the state wherever we're looking, whether we're iraq or iran today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from beginning to sell the idea of a two-state solution and they're all within this september of an international state system and we're going in the wrong direction. >> what i see on the ground and i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, you have an incredibly competent military but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor governance that the afghanistan paid and the institutions provide. and so we're pushing businesses to walk uphill and we never get there and i'm sure you -- it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's governance. >> that's true, too. but good governance brings us back to something like the democratization, something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture -- but it's going to be something the people will have a way
remains will help us get rid of too big to fail. >> thank you. ..y much >> and what do you do with your stolen moon rocks? don't try to sell them on the internet. ben mezrich on someone who tried. sign up for booktv alert, weekend schedules in your inbox. >> next, a panel from the 2011 los angeles times festival of books titled american history: blood and back rooms. it's about an hour. >> well, first, i just want to thank you all for coming on this beautiful day to talk about american history.- it's so great to see so many his people interested, and i'm getting a heads up that i'm not being heard in the back. is it too -- i don't have a really loud voice. is that better? closer, closer? oh, i'm going to --t >> [inaudible] >> okay.er how's that? i'm not used to this. i'm from montana.hat? we don't have microphones. u [laughter] any excuse you can find. i am from montana. any excuse you can find. we know that we are not supposed to have our cellphone on. we would appreciate it if you would turn that off. no person or recordings allow. appreciate if you would follow that. how you like to
-30 years ago and think of its reputation now. think of the books that were big in the 60s and 70s, if you're old enough to have been around then, they are very different books now. herbert and marshall and the coastal superstars then, and they don't show up now. that's, i think, the first thing. the other thing is biography of a person, you dig into letters. you dig into rem innocences and -- rem remanents and so on. this was just a delightful concept when i met the other authors and they told me about who the authors are and what they write about. that gives you a sense where to take this diversity of what's going on. >> so the other two books already published in this series, one is a biography of a confession by gary wills who has, of course, wrote about this several times during his career, and then this is a biography of the book of the dead by donald lopez up at the university of michigan. each of them treats this idea in each of the three in a different way, and still and some of the books that are still to come in this series also promise to be very interesting, and vie -- vanessa
and he should have been the big man and gone on to be successful but partly he drinks too much and did not have a ph.d. which was a large wound and also self-destructive. he argued, criticized the and complained about the british. where were you when i was getting by harvard degree? canyon and a british alike and it did not go well for him. he lost his first job. he is let go. he goes on to a hugely promising job in the research department at the central bank of 10 in could have been the opportunity of a lifetime but let go because he drinks on the job and is late to work and criticizes other people all the time. one more chance with a high ranking job as a senior development officer at the tourist development corporation. sounds like mid-level bureaucracy but it was a big job and he last four years he doesn't just drink on-the-job but two months arrested for drunk driving and starts to live in as he travels developing tourism he claims the title above him as saying he is the general manager. the general manager did not like that. >> host: it is interesting you talk about these persona
to the abortion clinic. she thought it was no big deal. as she walked into the clinic, something odd happened. another girl looked at her and said all babies want to be born. she ignored her. your baby had a heart. she thought this was propaganda. your baby has fingernails. that was odd. she walked into the abortion clinic and sat down. she glanced around and couldn't help that everyone was playing with their fingernails. tapping them, she thought fingernails, i have a life growing inside of me. she walked out of the abortion clinic. that was the end of the story. let me ask you this. how many remember the statistic that you gave you about a minute and a half go? how many of you remember what prompted jane? everybody remembers. fingernails. even though of you who remember the statistic 1,465,000. they have abandoned as an emotional tool. we think that intellectual argument trumps emotion. you hear it on talk radio all the time. we have -- of all of the logical arguments, we have all of the facts on our side. they rely on emotion all the time. yeah, well, because it works. we need to start tak
city is not the first place that would come to mind to have a big as giving rank. among other reasons because nothing ever freezes there. but, this is what we did last year, and we made it to the guinness book of records. so you ask yourself, and mexican sociologists ask this question a couple of years ago. why in the world that we do this? came up with a very intelligent answer. this is the kind of competition we like. we are the only ones competing. [laughter] you can't lose if you're in the competition for the world's biggest because nobody else is doing it. nobody else is crazy enough to do this and spend time or money on it. it's not going to happen. so we love that kind of competition. the problem, of course, is that aversion to competition when it extends into antitrust policy it gets complicated. i go into the same stories. carlos. but respectful but also somewhat critical, not of his personality or persona, but of his situation which also has to do with another trait that i described, individualism. this is not often been said that not only does slim concentrate and net worth
time. so i had this big battle about whether i was going to do the english assignment, and i remember saying to her in the midst of this heated discussion i didn't see the point during these assignments. they were a waste of time. i didn't see what to do this stuff and she said to me well, okay, you are obviously a bright kid and what you decide to do is find so what are we going to do here? and i said well, it seems to me that the point of this class is one, to make sure i have an understanding of the english language and research skills and i can make a coherent argument, so why don't you testing on that? she said why don't you mean? i said have me write something. she said fine, what are you going to write? i said why not a history of riots in america. she said okay. and i went off and several weeks later come back with i don't know how long it was that like a 140 page manuscript and she takes it home, comes back the next monday and this is okay i'm going to give you an essay for the course, but i don't -- i'm not really capable of evaluating this material and i make it from the pr
was very ambitious. >> that is another big feeney and i'm sure a lot of people want to learn about from your book and it's sort of how much of the sun do we see in the father and vice versa, and what comparisons and contrasts meaning we should take this moment to look at that. d.c. that president obama is barack obama senior's son is that clear to you? >> guest: absolutely although they shared a little time to cover only the first year of his life and a month later on. they had many things in common the first is their intelligence obviously both men are very smart and defined to some extent. but of the more ambitious and found a way to envision a life far beyond the somewhat prescribed circumstances of their birth. although obama, sr. was too self-absorbed and disdainful of public opinion to ever actually run for office. the moment that he was a part of the irrelevant dependent and 63, the transfer of kenya from the british to the canyons was huge. it defined him and his ambitions both have in common an absent parent which i think was quite profound, certainly for obama, jr., the presid
to think for me. they don't know i'm a little brother who doesn't like it when my big brothers tell me what to do, because they aren't always responsible for their own things. i don't tell my brothers what to do with their money. i'm smarter than they think i am. they should follow the rules." i'd ask that the entire letter be printed at the completion of my speech. and i thank eric -- the presiding officer: without objection. mr. enzi: and i thank him for his sage advice. it is disappointing to be here today dreask the unite addressid states senate on a topic that we should have dealt with months ago. our country is in a financial crisis. erskine bowles, the cochairman of the deficit commission, coined the situation we face as -- quote -- "the most predictable economic crisis in history" -- end quote. and yet there is no clear path forward to deal with both the short-term need to raise the debt limit and the long-term need to get spending under control. i'm disappointed we have made this discussion about the debt ceiling instead of our ever-increasing spending. when you spend beyond your m
. maybe this is, maybe it's not, but the big issue is malcolm think someone can sit down and shut at. i.t. is becoming more of a gender democrat, but the part of that is one also has to have ethical and personal liking for women, that it can't be just an exclusively political. but to me, the sexual and erotic is standing in for the political and theological. i've got to say, i found -- i mean, i couldn't agree more about this issue of separating malcolm little from malcolm x dement themed attorney at malcolm x been one that's not just about race, but also about gender. i find precisely what you describe, melissa, as this place in which there is a kind of focus on men and the ideas of men to the exclusion to be like ho-hum in the sense that that is the space in which most powers exercised in the united states and i daresay many places, but that is exactly the character of the year that's what it looks like, that's what it feels like and whether it's the nation of islam, whether it's the democratic party for the republican party or any other very powerful organization, political science d
are prone to violence but have reported side to them. can you just -- >> yes. there was a big part of his persona. he wrote poetry. he was always described in personal dealings with him as generally considered far from as screen. not a pleasant person. is not a pleasant person to be a round ball. much more rigid, much more didactic. mind you, we're talking about the characters, somebody who planned to 9/11. that didn't want to push that went too far. in portraying osama bin laden it was important to get him right in see him as his acolyte who is going to put his life on the line for this plot would see him as an inspirational figure. that only makes sense because you're not seeing him when you are the reader. you aren't seeing him through the americans what do you been seeing it to the point of view of someone who is actually experiencing and has been inspired by him. you want to understand how that could possibly be. >> one of the things your characters from the west german least seven common is that they are having to use different identities. he has to change its name. the characters a
the same standard. you can talk about president obama that he is a big boy, even talk about michele but leave the daughters out of it. they are little girls. come on. we don't do the work we could do to stand up and put a line in the sand for our people. can we put a line in the sand for our people? that is all i am asking for. you know and i know when we make the phone calls we do the work. one phone call people think of as 1,000 people but who calls? you say that was just messed up. i was so mad that was messed up. don't be mad. get even. danny glover had a verizon commercial. they got mad at his politics and he lost it. why has rush limbaugh and never lost anything. i am exposing myself. have my back, please. come on. they talk about us as though we are in human. no one stands up for us. what is wrong with us? that is a story of surviving and thriving. we only win the game when we play the game. we have got to play the game. >> i have a moment of shock when the girls went to africa with their mother. it was the first time i realized there are black girl living in the white house.
. that was a big part of bin laden's persona. he wrote poetry. and he is, he was always described in personal dealings with him as, you know, rather gentle and con said rate -- considerate, far from a screamer. zawahiri, i gather, is not a pleasant person to be around at all. much more rigid, much more didactic, mind you, we're talking about opposing characters who planned 9/11, so i don't want to push that one too far. but i think in portraying bin laden it was important to get him right and see him as his act colite who was going to put his life on the line for this plot would see him, as an inspirational figure. that only makes sense. because you're not seeing him when you're the reader. you're not seeing him through the americans' point of view, you're seeing him from the point of view from someone who's actually been inspired by him, and you want to understand how that could possibly be. >> and one of the things your characters from the west or the middle east have in common is that they're having to use different identities. brooke chandler, you know -- >> yeah. >> -- has to change his
with his son is not only with intelligence but he was very ambitious. >> host: that is another big theme that i'm sure a lot of people will want to learn about from your book, how much of the sun do we see in the father and vice versa? and what comparisons and contrasts there are. maybe we should take this moment to talk a little bit about that. to you see that president obama is barack obama sr. sun? is that very clear to you? >> guest: although they shared very little time together, really the first year of his life in a month later on. that many things in common. the first is there keen intelligence. both are very smart in that define their lives to some extent. both of them are very ambitious and found a way to envision a life far beyond the somewhat prescribed circumstances of their birth. also they were both very involved in the politics of their day. that defined also their lives although obama sr. was the too self-absorbed into disdainful of public opinion to run for office. the moment that he was a part of, the arrival independence in 63, the transfer of kenya run the british to
property. i don't think i would comment beyond that. >> big publisher of poems repress, thank you for a few minutes . . who remembers as a girl she lived next door to a lithuanian jewish family. she recalls she would call for young josephine to turn the light on for her. 60 years later you could hear the pride in her voice being called upon for that task. it's probable families living in our tenement open until the year 1935 discussed or of mitered norman thomas. tonight we are pleased to discuss his life and work with louisa thomas d. author of conscience. she will be signing copies of the book after the topic and keep in mind when you buy a book your supporting the author, the publisher and the museum. if you choose to become a member this evening, we will give you a complimentary copy of conscience. tonight's conversation is led by john mechem, executive editor and vice president of random house. a former editor of newsweek and pulitzer prize-winning author and commentator on politics,?g?g history and religious base in?gg america and is editor of our jeg public media and contributor tog
that's going on that really are designed to be one big branch stray teemingic thing wherever you look in the middle east, and that is to shore up the strength, the responsiveness of the state wherever they look, whether with iraq or iraq today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to sell the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine are all within the concept of the international space system. that is, we don't have strong systems and things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground when i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an up credibly well-led military, but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor government there is and the institutions provide, and it's like, you know, we're pushing this rock uphill and we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree and it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's government. >> guest: that's true too. it brings us back to democratization and that procedure and it will be their own culture, but it'
. the u.s. was doing many things wrong, often by not having a big enough government. the obama administration response to this to my thought fascinating. so prominent in their response, so unfair for the u.s. -- the you into said the u.s. is systematically violating human rights because last year we passed obama care and took a giant stride toward recognizing international human rights obligations in the health care area. this falls under the category of reassurance that these me less reassured. you know, i find it bothersome. i think that would have been an additional reason to vote against obama care if people had argued publicly that it was required for international human rights obligations. similarly in the controversy in recent weeks in wisconsin. i wish i had a dollar for every time someone has argued that what governor walker did in repealing some of the old public union rights actually was a violation of international human-rights. that has been very widely argued. so there is a pattern here. much as it was breached in the 1970's that the u.s. constitution required, if
the notion that our entitlement state is too big to afford but also too big to change politically. this is how a aaa country becomes aa, the first step on the march to greece." end of quotation. charles congratulat krauthammerl observer of the political scene, in his column friday in "the washington post" concluded with the following words: "obama faces two massive problems: jobs and debt. they're both the result of his spectacularly failed keynesian gamble, spendin spending that la stagnant economy with high and chronic unemployment and a stag staggering debt burden." and that's the problem, mr. president. a staggering debt burden that requires us to increase our debt ceiling and republicans are saying, in order to stop this cycle of more promises and more spending, we've got to apply some accountability, some common sense and good judgment, and that means, first and foremost, stop the spending. i would note, as i said before, that under president obama, annual spending has gone up by $1.2 trillion each of the years. the deficit by peds 1.4 trillion. and i ask again, do you notic
subsequent higher interest rates if we do not enact a big-time deficit reduction package. now, this year is our third straight trillion-dollar deficit. our national debt is 14.3 -- actually $14.5 trillion. and the president's budget would add $13 trillion in additional debt if he gets his way. i don't know about you, but i can't tolerate that. added to already almost a $15 trillion debt today. i've spoken previously about the debt bubble the nation finds itself in but i want to re-emphasize that point in light of the warnings from ratings agencies that our credit faces a downgrade absent real deficit reduction. currently federal debt held by the public equals a modern record of about 69% of g.d.p. and it's headed to 100% and we all know it. the congressional budget office reports that current tax and spending law takes that figure to 76% of g.d.p. over the next 10 years and we all know it's going to hit 100%. if we keep going with what the president is doing. and unfortunately, what my friends on the other side are doing. to put that number in perspective at the end of fiscal year 2008,
impacted by the rise of big bucks superstores so it would be interesting to see what they could do not just as borders retracts fifth and closes up shops as barnes & noble transitions into a digital format. >> what is the fiscal health of barnes & noble? >> that is in an interesting spot. record sales but because they spend so much money in terms of developing the know quote wind and the digital business they had to suspend the dividend for the last two quarters. wall street has not been entirely happy about this. there were also in the process of trying to sell themselves as of one year-ago in in early may, liberty media which is owned by john malone put in of bid at $17 a share and that is considered in the company is doing to diligence but it remains to be seen there are some favorable signs and also spoken highly of each other in the media, at this point*, perhaps not of up in the air but hardly a done deal. >> tell us about the publishers marketplace and if people want to follow you? >> i am a news editor for publishers marketplace which owns publishers lunch which reaches 40,000 subsc
three instances, there are more, but those are three big ones where, again, no clear authority by the constitution but no pro hicks in the constitution for the -- but no prohibition in the constitution to do so and where the vital security of the united states was at stake. i'll close on this: i believe this is just like those times. the security, the future improvement of the united states, and future generations depend upon the president taking this action, boldly and forthrightly, to preserve the integrity and to make sure that the obligations and the full faith and credit of the united states is not questioned. madam president, i yield the floor. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from indiana. mr. coats: madam president, thank you. i wonder if i could ask how much time is allocated? i know we're a little oust kill tear with the -- we're a little out of kilter with the allocation of time. how much time do i have to speak and i want to make sure my colleagues have sufficient time to speak also. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the
in history. indeed, that would just give a blank check to the big spenders. they could run for two years. and why is it so important to get a longer debt, bigger debt ceiling increase? and i also thought and believe we have an agreement that the debt ceiling shouldn't be increased more than spending is decreaseed. spending decreased over ten years. you cut $1 trillion, you raise the debt ceiling $1 trillion. we give you ten years on spending cuts, but immediately you get a $1 trillion increase in the debt ceiling. why are we in this fix? this is why. i hate to say it. this is why, there is no doubt about it. the president said last week the only bottom line that i have is that we extend this debt ceiling through the next election until
by a group of civil rights groups who had put together a big commission headed by two former secretaries of god, henry cisneros a democrat and i am drawing a blank on the republican from the state who used to play for all with the buffalos. yeah, jack kempe. the two of them were the heads of these two commissions and they studied the existence of housing discrimination and i will just quickly say because some of you may know about this, using audit studies. they demonstrated -- they issued their report in october. obama's elected in november. that report said racism still exist them what they were doing is looking up what happened in the last 40 years from 1968 when the housing act was established to 2008, 40 years later. so it still existed and i could give examples time permitted for almost every other institution in society. so this is what i meant. but every time that we start talking about racism people confuse racism with individuals. racism is not an individual. racism is an act. racism is not what one is. racism is what institutions do. >> just for the record, he has a new book o
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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